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the piper. the question is the creation of washington of the fiscal cliff or a creation of your investors and bondholders across the world that look at you in the same light as europe some day. we all know that day isn't here. this is a lesson for the republican party, and i think it's a lesson we should all take. instead of when we look at all these programs, mark, where are we going to make cuts and how terrible is this going to be, we need to judge our concern and empat empathy, not by the money, something marco rubio and paul ryan talked about, by the outcomes, not how much we spend but what we get out of it. look at something how much money we throw at it we'll august suggest more, more, more. >> government does such a good job tracking outcomes. >> let's track the outcomes of tax loopholes so if we're going to evaluate outcomes it's important to evaluate the outcomes of tax loopholes. >> how quickly will all this felt? say they have a deal three weeks into the new year, that doesn't help you if you're trying to run an agency budget because you've got to make plans for january 2nd. >
. >>> america has a spending problem, and washington is having a problem fixing t.republicans are okay with raising more revenue, but they don't want to raise taxes to do it. democrats only want to raise taxes on the top 2% and extend the bush tax cuts for everyone else. what they might agree on, cutting deductions. the middle class' most cherished tax break could be in the crosshairs of the fiscal cliff negotiations. we're talking about the mortgage interest deduction. it's been around for 99 years, but it's costing the government $80 billion this year and will reach $100 billion by 2014 making it the third largest tax expenditure according to the congressional research service. who is it really helping in the most recent irs tax data show 41 million people claim this deduction on their 2010 taxes, but the tax policy center points out it tends to benefit upper middle class families the most. for those with annual incomes of less than $40,000 a year, the average tax savings is just 91 bucks. for the people earning $250,000 a year, the annual tax savings runs about $5,500, and critics s
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2